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's always been an independent. >>> up next, how does bill clinton see his relationship with hillary? there is a fascinating tease. big bill speaks out on hillary. and this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> president obama's inaugural at a dry cleaner, we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. >>> president obama's inaugural parade will feature eight floats including a hawaii float to honor his birthplace, an illinois float to honor the first lady's home state and a kenyan float just to mess with republicans. why not? it's a parade. everyone loves a parade. >>> back to "hardball." bill clinton answers a question about hillary clinton's health and her plans for the future and thoughts about what lies ahead for their relationship. >> she's always been very, very healthy. and she has very low blood pressure, very low standing heart beat. i tell her she's still got time to have three more husbands af
does bill clinton see his relationship with hillary? there is a fascinating tease. big bill speaks out on hillary. and this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ female announcer ] going to sleep may be easy, but when you wake up in the middle of the night it can be frustrating. it's hard to turn off and go back to sleep. intermezzo is the first and only prescription sleep aid approved for use as needed in the middle of the night when you can't get back to sleep. it's an effective sleep medicine you don't take before bedtime. take it in bed only when you need it and have at least four hours left for sleep. do not take intermezzo if you have had an allergic reaction to drugs containing zolpidem, such as ambien. allergic reactions such as shortness of breath or swelling of your tongue or throat may occur and may be fatal. intermezzo should not be taken if you have taken another sleep medicine at bedtime or in the middle of the night or drank alcohol that day. do not drive or operate machinery until at least 4 hours after taking intermezzo and you're fully awake. driving, eating, or en
in contrast to a bill clinton or some of others. but even the president who is come in with very high ratings usually tend to plun nj the second term. twigt eisenhower, one of the most popular presidents ever in american history, by 1957 late and 15958, his ratings were down to about 40%, which was very low in those days. in a way it's an index to the fact the second term president is doing well because you want to see him spending political capital. if he leaves really popular, it may mean he hasn't done enough. >> since world war ii only presidents reagan and clinton went up in popularity? >> indeed. >> a hard act to follow and statistically you're not looking at necessarily more popularity. >> absolutely. >> people come in for a second term and think, okay, now i can relax, i don't have to campaign anymore and i can go do my business. the problem is they are focused on their legacy and things always go wrong in the second term. always, always, always. there's not a president you can mention. they have to sort of stay stay on their toes. they can't relax and just say this is my second term,
there was this young arkansas democratic governor bill clinton unseating an incumbent republican president. the uncomfortable part of that memory for democrats is that even though bill clinton did beat president bush in 1992 he did so with only 43% of the vote. bill clinton got 43% of the vote that year. president bush got 37% of the vote. and even though it is always a bad idea to do math on television, this one isn't that hard. if you add up 43 and 37 you do not get anywhere near 100% of the vote. what happened to the rest of the vote? the wacky thing about the 1992 election in terms of thinking about american binary red versus blue party politics is that another guy who ran that year, a third person, got almost 20% of the vote. it was ross perot, right? giant sucking sound. ross perot got a very large proportion of the vote for a third-party candidate. nearly 20%. and who knows how the votes would have been divided between bill clinton and george h.w. bush had ross perot not been in there that year. but one thing that's often forgotten about the 1992 race was that ross perot was not the
, president obama held fewer news conferences than george w. bush or bill clinton. over four years the president held 79 such briefings, that is ten fewer than mr. bush and 54 fewer than president clinton. >>> starting this weekend, president obama's limousine will carry license plates with the phrase taxation without representation. it's a protest over the district of colombia not having voting representatives in congress. president clinton used the plates but george w. bush chose to use a different design without the protest phrase. >>> white house is changing the signature threshold from 25,000 to 100,000 for official responses to petitions on the website. not a bad move. it comes after a request that government build a star wars like death star that got enough signatures for an official white house response. >>> and in utah, george burnett, a pro oil activist and small business owner known as the i love drilling guy is using his new smoothy shop to take a stand against liberal spending. he charges liberals $1 more for than conservatives for a 16 ounce smoothy. >> i'm very open
bush's second inaugural. she also covered 2001, the first bush inaugural. it was 1997, the bill clinton second inaugural. it was 1993, the first bill clinton inaugural. she was there also in 1989 when george bush, the elder took over. she was there in 1985, president reagan's re-election. she was there in 1981, the first reagan inaugural. that's andrea mitchell. if i end up doing these for as long as andrea mitchell has done these, i will be covering every inauguration from now until 2041, by which time i will be coming to you, presumably, as a ho hologram. so help me god. second inaugural, as opposed to a first inaugural when one president is leaving and another is starting, and we're covering a second inauguration, like we will be this year there's something different. governing is already under way. the president has started some things that he intends to finish in his second term. sort of a sense of continuity, well informed expectation about what kind of president this is going to be and where he is likely to go. when president obama was inaugurated. first time, there was none of t
gingrich shut the government down and bill clinton was president. bill clinton won that hands down. and look, the one thing that i think michael and i agree on and the people in the campaign to fix the debt and simpson bowes, is we're not going to fix our problem, rev, by who wins political battles. if the republican party wants to eat itself alive, sure it will make them happy but you'll lose suburban cleveland, suburban philadelphia, sub suburban st. s and places like that. they're going to go down. what good does it do if they lose control of the house in 2014? it seems to me to be a death wish. >> well, michael, you were chair of the republican party and clearly this is politically damaging if, in fact, they go through with it. congress u under republican control, is now less popular than root canals, replacement reves, cockroaches and don trump. i mean, as a chairman of a party, you chaired it when they had the great midterm election. can you now come back to a party that is less popular than cockroaches? and root canal and tell them you really don't want to do this? >> look,
decided not to do it. bill clinton used that license plate. symbolically it's an important move for people who live in washington. at the end of the day, it doesn't really change the status of washingtonians who feel they are taxed without being represented in d.c. but symbolically, something that washingtonians were looking for and he's delivering on that, made some people happy yesterday. >> carrie, great to see you. thank you. >> thanks, thomas. >>> as we await the president's announcement on gun control proposals, we asked and you answered, did the nra go too far by focusing on president obama's daughters in a new ad. k.j.l. tweets yes, this new ad is disgusting. you can be a member, want to protect second amendment rights and say no to assault weapons. from patricia, does the nra understand the magnitude of the potus' daughters being a member of the first family and what that entails? from rusty, absolutely. family members should always be off limits. we encourage you to keep the comments coming in to us on twitter or facebook. also, how does the white house now respond to the nra ad?
to say yes. ronald reagan and i'll say it, i voted to impeach the guy, bill clinton. bill clinton would always figure out that when republicans said something he agreed with he would tell people. hey, you know that's a good idea. they are right. and i guess as a politician that's what i don't understand about republicans these days. i always look for an excuse to agree with my political opponents. if they say something i agree with, i embrace it because i know that's going to give me a lot more credibility when i start talking about the debt, when i start talking about tax cuts, when i start talking about cutting regulations. if i can find something on gun control that doesn't offend my sensibilities on the second amendment, that are consistent with what reagan said and scalia said, that's great oil embrace that. i'll win votes from independent swing voters and then i win on the deficit. >> you can -- >> on cutting regulations. where it matters. >> you can still be a principled conservative. this is all music to my ears. joe i got to take a break. stay with me. we'll have you back. i wa
, for the better part of two decades. the last time west virginia and kentucky backed a democrat was bill clinton in 1996. he won west virginia by 93,000 votes and kentucky by 13,000. four years later, gore lost both states and it was a 41,000 vote gap in west virginia. more than 230,000 in kentucky. the gap got wider when john kerry lost in 2004. you see the pattern here. president obama improved on those numbers slightly in 2008, but still lost both states and his numbers fell off the table, if you will, this past november, the gap nearly doubled to 180,000 in west virginia and he lost kentucky by more than 400,000 votes. but last year, the war on coal had become a familiar theme on billboards, campaign signs and on tv. coal related donors poured more than $12 million into the campaign. 90% of it to republican, believe it or not, but to blame the president's agenda doesn't take in the bigger picture. coal production has dropped because demand is down and easily accessible coal has disappeared. low cost natural gas and fracking threatens to cut them even more. never the less, the politics of the
at the inauguration of bill clinton. besides being one of the most renowned and influential voices of this generation, maya angelou is a big president obama supporter and also very vocal during his re-election campaign, as well. she joins me now via telephone to talk about the inauguration. miss angelou, good afternoon to you. >> good afternoon. how are you? >> i'm fantastic. it is so much of an honor to have you on. you, of course, worked alongside reverend martin luther king, jr., back in the '60s in the southern christian leadership conference. in fact, i know dr. king died on your birthday in april. how does it feel to see the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time on martin luther king, jr., day? >> i tell you, it's so exciting it's hardly livable, that is to say young people, people after my generation can take it with more e kwaun imity, more easily, but for me having been raised in the really, the awful south, it is amazing to think that a black man, not only has been president once, but has been elected a second time. this is really rare in our history. there are on
on that show. >>> former president bill clinton was a big hit at "the golden globes" and also popular backstage after his appearance on the broadcast. actress clare danes says she was invited to meet clinton in a private room. actress jessica alba was already in the room and so was actress rosario dawson. and that's your morning dish of "scrambled politics." >>> and now for a look at the weather, here's nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer. good morning. >> good morning to you. it has been really nice across the east coast. above average. it hasn't been exceptionally warm. we've been missing the sunshine, that's for sure. we are going to see most of our rain today just south of new york city, stretching through the mid-atlantic region right down into the new orleans area, right down into the gulf of mexico. it is heavy at times, but you can see it's just this strip of rain. and it is going to continue to push out of southern new england. so it's not going to be raining all day across portions of connecticut and massachusetts. even new york city, we started off with some light rain. earlier this morni
. >> former president bill clinton has been getting more questions these days about his wife hilary's future including the 2016 presidential race and her health. >> she's always been very, very healthy and she has very low blood pressure, very low standing heart beat. i tell her she still has time to have three more husbands after me. whenever i'm stubborn about something in our contact quest at my self-improvement she refers to me as her first president. >> and a reminder that msnbc will have all day coverage monday of president obama's second inauguration. and that's your morning dish of scrambled politics. >>> now for a look at the national weather we turn to meteorologist bill karins. good morning. >> some good one liners in there. very entertaining. not fun later today. the deep south your first snow event of the season is coming your way. we have winter storm warnings in pink covering much of the state of virginia, north carolina, central alabama and central portions of mississippi. a little sliver of northern portion of georgia. you can see the movement the storm is taking. right now
california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 in some ways watershed election. ends the 40-year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative cast to them. tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s we'll be talk about as the religious right. the rise of evangelical involvement in the process. so national defense, he was a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in right wing anticommunist politics in the late 1960s, one of the things that led him to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions and did so long people like barry gold water. early in his career he was a staunch advocate of unions in south carolina, back in the 30s and 40s, when the union vote was an
. >> doesn't get much better than that. how random was there, bill clinton showed up on stage and got a standing ovation. >> wow. what an exciting special guest. that was hillary clinton's husband. oh, my god. that was exciting. >> takes some guts to call him hillary clinton's husband. the front runners shared a wealth of awards. "les miserables" won for best motion picture. "argo" won the best motion picture drama award and he won best director, a category what he was not nominated for in the oscars. before will ferrell and christian wiig prevented jessica lawrence with an award, they swore they watched every movie in the comedy or musical category. >> emily blunt, always abusing. >> when the salmon are coming out -- >> comes out. >> the -- when the bad guy comes -- >> when the bad guy comes, the salmon is like -- and you know -- >> you're in yemen. >> you're in yemen. >> my gosh. love jennifer lawrence. >> j.lo. >> and the silver. i thought it was an animated film. >> they obviously had not seen any of the films. >> for tv "homeland" huge winner taking home best series drama award a
for future presidents. >> exciting special guest. that was hillary clinton's husband. >> that was bill clinton. >> that was. >> it was bill rodham clinton. >> that's right. >>> and ben affleck finally gets his just due for "argo." >> it's an extraordinary thing in your life. these nominees are exceptional talents. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. thanks for joining us. president obama used the final press conference of his first term in office to draw a line in the sand on debt ceiling compromises. joining me now for our daily fix cris alissa, msnbc contributor of post politics.com, chuck todd, nbc news chief white house correspondent, political director, host of the daily rundown and questioner of the president and usa today's aush washington bureau chief. chuck, first to you. you were in the room. tell us about the dynamic you tried to pin the president down on the debt ceiling. tell us what your take-away is from all of this. >> i would sum it in two words. frustration and resignation. i want to point something out here. jay carney tweeted out one specific quotes
plus bill clinton. after all, it was a decisive victory, but it was a victory for the man, not necessarily the party. >> is that how you read it, john? do you see this being an obama victory as opposed to a liberal victory or they intertwined? >> i never want to disagree too much with one of the greater politicians in american history, but i would suggest that there was a little more party there. you won a couple u.s. senate seats that they weren't supposed to win sometimes because of republican flubs. 1.4 million more people voted for democrats for the house than voted for republicans, only gerrymandering kept the house where it is. and so i think that this man has done a lot to build a broad progressive coalition, but your core question is the important one. can you hold that coalition together? >> mayor -- >> let me say this to you though, i believe that it would have been a more telling benefit for the party if it had been nancy pelosi re-emerging as the speaker of the house and if democrat governors had won in the numbers that they needed to win in as well as legislat
bill clinton, but they were a slightly more reasonable party in terms of reaching compromises on other issues with clinton from that point forward. >> let me ask you. if they're just threatening a downgrade, again, what is your view on how bad that is for the u.s. economy? ? i mean, there are lots of perilous things that will kick into place. >> in the short-term, sadly, perversely not so bad. >> right. >> i don't think it's going to have a huge impact on -- short-term. the question is it's a long-term thing, and that's two, three, four, five, ten years out, and that's what you are fighting against. yeah, short-term, i don't think anyone will care. >> nobody goes to fish to decide -- >> why do they rate treasuries? go, fitch. go away, s&p. we know what the interest rates are. that's how people think of debt. >> what we are capable of, and are we -- >> pa what our standing should be and what our rating should be. there's no question. i don't think in the short-term we have any -- and, sadly, that gives no cover to anybody in washington on this issue. >> it does not. well, we will certai
" and "game change" won three, including best mini series. president bill clinton walked out to a standing ovation and introduced a clip from "lincoln." >> a tough fight to push a bill through a bitterly divided house of representatives. winning it required the president to make a lot of unsavory deals. they had nothing to do with big issues. i wouldn't know anything about that. >> special guest, that would. that's right. is even better for the cup. new single serve cafe collections from maxwell house. now available for use in the keurig k-cup brewer. always good to the last drop. five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. before you begin an aspirin regimen. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is
me. >> bill clinton with dr. nancy snyderman. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington, where president obama is trying to mobilize the nation, all of us, to deal with gun violence. >> from the letter that julia wrote me, she said, i know that laws have to be passed by congress, but i beg you to try very hardly. julia, i will try very hard. >> and joining me now for our daily fix, chuck todd, nbc news chief white house correspondent and host of "the daily rundown" and host malia henderson. thank you very much, both of you. chuck, the atmosphere there at the white house as the president unveils this and the fact that he brought in families from newtown and children who had written to him, what is the white house hoping to gain as it takes on, probably, the biggest political fight of this second term? >> look, this wasn't a simple policy rollout, this was the launch of an emotional campaign, this was an emotional president, and he was using any possible tool he could have in order to try to launch a campaign, because the reality -- they know the reality of the big three proposal
he did, clinton about race, the welfare reform bill. people overlook a lot of things troubling. the other piece of this, melissa, this president, everything he did turned out to be about race. this is the first president that had to confront questions about his birthplace, confront witch doctor signs, people saying he was a black hitler. now the butcher of benghazi on the right. the over-the-top reaction to him that most people looked at as having a racial component. when he was elected, the right had two choices. they can react as a typical president or go absolutely insane. they chose the latter. it made african-americans overlook their anxieties about not being addressed. it made african-americans angry. it's why they showed up in large numbers. >> that, plus voter suppression. that was remarkable. you know what? i think there may be an interesting lesson from what you said about bill clinton, which those of us who are progressive have always wanted an alliance among african-americans and lower income whites who, in many cases face the same problems. if you look at the indus
the deep end. and that's when bill clinton and like you said the dlc brought them together. here's the really disturbing thing. i remember, mike, back in 1995, a lot of people were talking about colin powell running for president. and i didn't want colin powell to run for president. he was a moderate. i was a conservative. but it wasn't the entire party and me against colin powell. like there were moderates in the center of the party. and we had this very positive give and take. >> what's happened? >> this tug. >> what's happened? >> the moderates in the party have collapsed. >> where are those voices coming from? >> i am now considered by a lot of the right-wing looneys to be a moderate, to be a, quote, rino. anybody that's listened to anything i've said on taxes, on the budget, on the fiscal cliff, i mean, i think my party made a horrible mistake on the fiscal cliff, and yes, i would stare at the president on a government shutdown and say, yeah, maybe shutting down the government's reckless, but you know what's even more reckless? continuing to spend the way you and harry reid
interaction of our one of our second producers found. this is back in clinton -- bill clinton facing the exact same kind of charge and railing to andrea mitchell against the bean counters who were, essentially, auditing his diversity record. take a look. >> i think a president's staff and, net ought to look like america. i think it ought to look like america. >> today clinton rejected complaints from women's groups that he hadn't delivered. >> people doing this talking are by and large are talking about quotas and i i don't believe believe in quotas. >> he was visibly angry critics are ignoring subcabinet appointees who are female into they would count against the administration, the bean counters. if i had appointed white men to that position and you know that's true. >> well, a question that we have to ask here is -- if we want to solve this problem and i think we all do, are we talking about combatting what's called "sexism?" for example, is the reason the white house press core has a certain problem with balance of types of people because they're there's people that think that women aren't
to be a situation like when richard nixon was vilified and history judged him fairly over time. similarly with bill clinton. presidents take on big issues that are not popular of the day but history judges them better. i think this will be one of those things that people will say, wow, that was a visionary thing to do. it wasn't popular at the time, but it was a visionary thing to do. i think history will judge him fairly. >> what do you think, though, on jobs that the president could do that would be equal to health care reform? >> i have a big idea. you've heard me talk about obama 2.0. it's all about energy. it's not about drill, baby, drill. it's about natural gas, shale oil -- these are opportunities to transform america. lots of jobs and things we need. we would be less dependent on foreign oil. i think he's going to embrace it. he's already done it, already given the approval that we can export to folks where we have free trade agreements. that's a home run for him. >> rachel, what are you seeing as being a big ticket piece of legislation the president can get passed and have be part of his
in the second term. >> do you think that this is also something like a precursor to bill clinton's globalization as well? do you believe it is the operation that the president will use five years from now when he isis trying to figure o the next five yearof his life? >> well, it will be the way ta reagan and roosevelt governed by rally i rallying the american public. there three forces in politics in america, the democrats and the republicans and the public opinion. occasionally the congress will rally against the president which is known to happen quite often. when bush proposed social security reform, congress rally and that was the end of that. and sometimes the president and congress can defy public opinion, but they will pay a price. >> and bill just talked about the legislative branch and the executive branch, but let's talk about the judiciary, because president obama in the second term could have an opportunity to nominate at least one and perhaps two supreme court justices and he has made the mark and nominated two women, and the first latina ever to the high court. let's take a listen
traditional progressive approach. as for your first question, absolutely, john. hillary clinton would, in fact, keep papering over this issue, although i do think there would at least be some kind of a bill bradley-style challenge. in 2000 al gore faced a challenge from bill bradley on his left. it wouldn't be as robust as bradley was in 2000, i don't think -- and that wasn't terribly robust in 2000, but i think there would be some nominal challenge from her left that would say, you know, democrats can't go back to sort of clinton-style politics. now, given her popularity, as you mentioned, john, across demographic and across ideological lines, i think it would be fairly minimal. there would be some kind of challenge there, i believe. >> gene, jonathan just mentioned sherrod brown's sense that, you know, they weren't going to go near entitlements because entitlements, that's who the democratic party is. that's who they are. entitlements are now 20% think of federal spending. how do the democrats, the republicans, how does this country survive economically without addressing entitlements? and b
to be lofty, inspirational and unifying, if anything? >> you know, i was reading bill clinton's second inaugural where he talks about, you know, the status quo nature of government which we see today as well, that americans a americans are to turn this division the government the way it is. the petty bickering they did for big things. i think the president wants to try to talk about where he feels he can have the most impact in his second term domestically and internationally which is a huge piece, by the way. because i think his first term internationally was about coming home, was about sort of pulling america back from its projection of power. there are so many both real problems and crises but also opportunities for the president. so i think that the speech is really about where he wants to have the most impact. and i think that's how he'll be judged, and that's where people will really take notice of what he says. >> david, before you tell us who's on "meet the press" this sunday, back to the speech for just a moment. do you think there's any chance at all that the president will
accomplishment for him. something that bill and hillary clinton failed to do during their presidency. a democratic priority for decades. he got financial regulation, which is new rules for wall street, which are just in the process now are being impleme implemented, as health care is. neither had a full chance to take effect. he did not get his goals on energy and changing the energy foundations of the american economy. he's going to try to do some of that in his second term with regulatory authority, and he did achieve some measure of economic stability and recovery, but there's a way to go. remember, he took office during a financial crisis, losing 700,000 jobs a month. we're growing, but growing slowly. he's got to try to build on that. >> picking up on that right there, it is a rather mixed bag when you look at the answer to the question, are you better off now than you were four years ago? let's go through some of the accomplishments. median income, federal debt, americans on food stamps, all down. worsened. staying on par, unemployment, same as four years ago. the dow nearly do
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)

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